The project

Earth is a very small planet, part of an immense Universe. Fifty years ago Man first set foot on a celestial body, “conquering” the Moon; in the future, we may see footprints on Mars and on asteroids, as well. Scientists have sent satellites into orbit to observe celestial objects under many aspects and to improve our understanding of the Universe; probes were launched into space to explore areas far away from us.

From Earth we can therefore branch out, and discover fascinating things while moving “outside” of our planet. But what if we changed perspective and point of observation? Which messengers from space communicate with us every day, and what do they say? Consider what we can see, observe, receive and collect while standing on Earth: radiation, particles, small and large objects. All these offer us an enormous amount of information and allow us to study celestial bodies – objects in the sky that are mostly still mysterious to us, to understand where we come from and how the Universe is evolving in its totality and complexity. Our knowledge of the Universe is vastly improved by the analysis of what reaches Earth, and so are the technologies involved in our everyday life and improving the world in which we live.

Light, various kinds of radiation, cosmic rays, neutrinos, subatomic particles, small and large meteorites… are all messengers that come from near, far and farther areas of the Universe, bringing us valuable information even from the most remote corners of the Sky.

The project aims to further research on space messengers and to spread knowledge on the topic, by offering a wide array of informative and educational meetings and laboratories (scientific and artistic), of astronomical observations, of active involvement in the collection and subsequent analysis of what arrives on Earth. Participation to the project is open to adults, children, school classes of all age as well as guests of rehabilitation centres, hospitals and recovery communities.

The PRISMA project, coordinated by the National Institute of Astrophysics, will be a partner of the project – its objective being the monitoring of bolides and recovery of any residual meteorites.

The Pavia University History Museum, the Planetary and Astronomical Observatory Cà del Monte, the Department of Physics and the Department of Earth and Environmental Science planned all activities to encourage anyone involved to walk a path that begins afar and will take them farther still.

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Goals

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Team

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Lidia Falomo Bernarduzzi

| Founder

Lidia Falomo Bernarduzzi

| Founder
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Gabriele Albanesi

Gabriele Albanesi

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Silvia Torri

Silvia Torri

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Ester Maria Bernardi

Ester Maria Bernardi

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Maria Pia Riccardi

Maria Pia Riccardi

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Fabrizio Boffelli

Fabrizio Boffelli

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Andrea Vai

Andrea Vai

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Athos Maria Callegari

Athos Maria Callegari

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Francesco Zucca

Francesco Zucca

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Matteo Soldi

Matteo Soldi

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Marco Liscidini

Marco Liscidini

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Daniele Gardiol

Daniele Gardiol

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